Coyotes are not always the bad guys

Letters to the editor

I read an article in Tuesday’s newspaper about coyotes and it makes the coyote the villain.
I have been around coyotes all my 48 years of life. I just want to express my opinion and a few facts about the coyotes.
Coyotes are not very big animals. They range in weight from 20 to 40 pounds and are the next-to-smallest canid. The coyote’s cousin the fox is the smallest canid.
Coyotes are never alone and they mate for life, which is about 8 to 10 years. The male and female coyote both help raise the pups. There can be anywhere from one to 19 pups in a litter and they have two litters a year.
This is definitely a full-time job for both parents.
Coyotes never kill more than they can eat. Domestic dogs that have packed will kill just for the pleasure of killing and the coyotes will get blamed for it.
Coyotes are opportunists. They eat rabbits, mice, ground squirrels, pocket gophers, birds, frogs, toads, snakes, insects and other small mammals and many kinds of fruit.
I have seen them kill and eat rattlesnakes. … I have also seen them eat skunks and steal ground squirrels and pocket gophers from badgers.
Coyotes very rarely kill livestock, but in all fairness I have seen them kill chickens and newborn calves. There are a few bad apples in every barrel.
All in all, coyotes are our friends. They clean up dead carcasses of animals and control the rodent population. This keeps the diseases down.
Without the coyote there really would be a wildlife problem.

David Lynn Kittrell
Clovis

It simply doesn’t add up that the price of crude oil has dropped in the last few weeks, but gasoline prices haven’t gone down that much in this area.
Gas prices in Oklahoma City, for instance, are 20 cents a gallon less than in Clovis. And in Amarillo, gas prices are 10 to 12 cents lower.
This puts a burden on those with a fixed or lower income and who are barely getting by.
Please give us a break.

Gary Danner
Clovis

A few days ago, news services quoted North Korea’s Kim Jong II as saying he plans to test his first nuclear bomb soon.
A couple of days later, news services reported that F-117 stealth bombers flew from their base in Alamogordo, aiming for “an unknown destination in the Pacific.”
On June 27, news services ran a story demonizing Kim Jong II as “A communist leader who has 200 professionals working just to satisfy his immense hunger for food while starving his own people.”
Connecting dots outlines two possibilities: Either these stories are aimed at Kim Jong II with hopes of bluffing him out of testing his bomb or U.S. war drums are rolling against Korea.
Bombing North Korea would shift attentions away from Iraq.

Dan True
Clovis