4/27 Letters to the editor

Downtown could use more trash cans
Imagine a hot August afternoon. A young couple has just left one of our stores on Main Street. Upon entering the car, it becomes obvious their infant has, uh, downloaded into his software! The odor is the kind that will test even a mother’s love.

Then Mom and Dad start looking for a place to deposit this little blessing (the diaper, not the baby). The only real trash receptacle I have seen on Main Street is in front of the Wells Fargo Bank. There is also a wastepaper basket a block further south and across the street. Both are usually overflowing.

So our fictional couple … is then left with three options: Take the dirty diaper with them, walk it all the way around the block to an alley in search of a dumpster or just drop it on the street.

Judging from all the litter lining our curbs, the third option is the most popular downtown.

Many arguments exist for not having trash receptacles on our Main Street sidewalks beside the fact they cost money. Subject to wear, they can become unsightly themselves. Our high winds can knock them over and some people just won’t use them no matter how convenient they are.

On the other hand, a sturdy, wind-resistant and highly visible (let’s say purple and white) receptacle uniformly placed in our downtown area would say a lot about us as a community.

Mike Hess
Clovis

Drug cleanup shared responsibility
Recently I went to the mall and, upon leaving, a young girl approached me and asked if I could spare a dollar for her to buy some food. I looked at her and noticed track marks up and down her arm from where she probably had been shooting drugs. I hesitated but gave her the dollar because I thought maybe she really was going to buy herself some food — or just maybe I had helped her put the last nail in her coffin.

It has bothered me for quite some time, but I will never know whether this young lady is still with us or gone from this Earth.

My daughter is a state police officer and she said these kids on drugs are not wanted by their parents — either they are also on drugs or just want to get rid of them. Imagine parents not caring enough about their kids and hoping they will die on drugs. Some parents, huh?

My oldest son recently retired as a federal agent and he said he cannot understand why this drug mess here has not been cleaned up. For the small size of our community and the small population, it should have been cleaned up a long time ago.

Well I, along with a lot of others in the community, have wondered the same thing. Whose fault is it? Those responsible for cleaning it up? Or ours, the citizens of Clovis?

But remember it takes two to tango.

Duane E. Jacklin
Clovis

Willing families should consider hosting
This August, two families in Clovis will enjoy a special experience by welcoming into their homes high school exchange students from Germany and Italy. These volunteer host families are participating in the SHARE! Student Exchange Program for the 2005-2006 school year. These international exchange students are eager to learn about how Americans live.

I am prompted to write an expression of enormous gratitude to the host families, the high schools and community. As the regional director for this program, I have helped local coordinators find the host families and helped them select a student who best fits their family. Local coordinators and our regional office staff will supervise and monitor our families and exchange students throughout their stay.

There are still several outstanding candidates awaiting host families. If anyone has thought about hosting, now is an excellent time to start. Please contact me as soon as possible. This is a great opportunity to SHARE! your heart and home with the rest of the world.
Our Web site is at:
www.sharesouthwest.org

Yvette Coffman
SHARE! Southwest Regional Director
Allen, Texas