Religion doesn’t change with technology

By Judy Brandon: Local columnist

We do live in amazing times. Computer technology has given us new words such as travel drive, Wi-Fi and blogs.

Think about the word blog. I read each week Beth Moore’s blog and two or three others.

Funny though, five years ago, I would have thought blog was something that sounded like it belonged in the bayou.

My computer really links me to the world. I can sit at home or in my office and tap into libraries far away, explore official documents from the U.S. Department of Education, and watch in real time the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem via a live web cam.

That’s the world of information technology. When I try to absorb this vast world of technology, it is too much to sort through. It all takes place with little knowledge on my part. At high speeds, in special computer language, data lines transfer knowledge from one computer to the next.

Basically, all computers cooperative with one another. If I send out a request, the system takes my request for information, the search goes to the top level domains, filters down, data is located and quickly I view the document of information in my office. The search engine I use even tells me how many seconds it took to get the information for me. Then I print what I see on my screen by just clicking. Amazing.

With a click of a mouse, thousands of miles are covered and information is transferred at phenomenal speeds. We are linked together by computers in this world. We are all brought near to one another through the contact among computers exchanging information.

But what happens when the computers go down? What would happen if everyone decided they no longer wanted to be part of the whole Internet system? We would not longer be connected.

But there is something like being connected in the spiritual realm that is much more powerful and wonderful. Paul said, “But now in Christ Jesus you who were once far away have been brought near through the blood of Christ (Ephesians 2:13). What application does that have for us?

To me that says two things. First, Christ through His sacrifice on the Cross made it possible for us to know the Father. Second, we have been brought near to other believers.

When my father died, we had many visitors. The night after he died, two women from another church came to see us. They spoke only Spanish but through an interpreter they told us how our father had ministered to their church. I could see the respect they had for him, and most important, the great love they had for the Lord.

We couldn’t understand Spanish but the common bond we felt with them was indescribable. We were all in Christ and therefore brought together by the blood of Christ.

Computers are remarkable but they are manmade, and when people stop operating them, they are ineffective. Yet the connection that believers have with one another is eternal. In that respect, I am through Christ connected with all believers all over the world, whether they be in Australia, Zambia, Greenland, China or Clovis.

My relationship with Christ does not depend on upgrades or technology. I only have to take to heart words like repent, believe, obedience, and faith. Now that is a connection and it is really out of this world.

Judy Brandon is a Clovis resident. Contact her at:
cbrandon@plateautel.net