Letters to the Editor: Racism not at root of all injustices

It seems everyone feels their ethnicity is being discriminated against. Anything said that is not favorable to a person of a different race is taken as racist.

We have National Hispanic Heritage Month, Cinco de Mayo and Black History Month. But if there was a White History Month, it would be considered racist.

There are African Americans, Mexican Americans, etc., and then there are just Americans. White people are called derogatory names, and that is acceptable. But if white people call other races names, they are considered racist.

There is the United Negro College Fund, the NAACP, and Black Entertainment Television. If there was a White College Fund, a White Entertainment Television, or any organization for only white people, it would be considered racist.

Hispanics and black people have marches and protests for their rights, but if white people had the same marches and protests, it would be racist. It seems Hispanics, blacks, and others can be proud of their races, but if whites speak up for their race, it is considered racist.

I don’t believe students should be forced to learn Spanish, and I don’t believe we should have government documents in Spanish. We don’t translate everything in Japanese, Chinese, etc., so why is Spanish different?
This is America, and English is the accepted language here.

The point I am trying to make is it seems only whites are considered racist.

This is America. I believe all legal residents are Americans. But it seems some people want the advantages and freedoms of America, but retain loyalty and allegiance to another country. They want to have their own organizations, special rights, and fly their own flag.

Maybe what some perceive as prejudice and injustice toward them is brought on by their own actions.

Pat Lee
Portales

Emergency workers’ qualifications merit raise
I used to publish the quarterly newsletter for the Local Emergency Planning Committee. In the August 2004 edition of that letter, there is a seven-page educational article regarding the fire department and its employees, as well as what their capabilities are.

It tells the whole story regarding training, qualifications, and the department’s capabilities. At the time this was published copies were provided to the all sitting city commissioners. I’m sure that copies can be made available to any commissioner today who would like one, to review what the fire department does in depth and detail.

Copies are available from the Clovis Office of Emergency Management and the original file can be made available electronically to anyone who wants one.

Commissioners should review this article and if they still refuse to reintroduce a revised pay plan for Clovis firefighters, I believe they are not in touch with reality.

Many of us have worked all our lives to make a home and furnish it. One fire or disaster, without adequate emergency response, and we could lose it all.

We want to remain healthy but emergencies happen. We will demand the best of our EMTs so why not make sure they are available in adequate quantity and fully trained?

And one major hazardous materials incident and hundreds could be impacted.

I pray that the local government and the public will get behind the fire department on this issue.

Robert Baker
Clovis

Drinking, driving wrong under any circumstances
This is again what we call small-town politics. A city manager, and retired police officer, gets stopped at a check point and guess what? Busted, but he gets a $100 fine and a finger wave saying naughty boy.

What are the odds that if Joe Thomas didn’t get stopped that the rest of that drink would have been finished, and possibly more? I just can’t believe the bad judgment coming from this decision, and we as tax payers are trusting him to run our city!

I think if that’s all the punishment he gets, he should at least make a public apology and go tell our kids in school it’s not OK for a former police office and a city manager to make mistakes like that, and drinking and driving is wrong for anyone.

Steven Gershon
Clovis