City commission candidates — District 1

Editor’s note: The Clovis News Journal asked Clovis City Commission candidates to answer the following questions in 150 words or less. The election is March 4.

Candidate: Randal Crowder
Age: 57
Occupation: Builder/developer
Prior elected positions: City commissioner and Mayor Pro Tem since 2004

—What do you want to see happen to Hotel Clovis and how do you propose we get there?
I believe that everyone would like to see the lights come on inside the Hotel Clovis. It is a building of great historical and architectural value.
The MainStreet Program is entering the second year of a five-year plan, proposed by Mayor (David) Lansford, to make every effort possible to locate funding, through grants, New Mexico capital outlay, private investors, or any other source, in order to clean up the hotel and acquire adjoining properties for parking. I believe that they are on track and doing everything possible to accomplish this goal.
I still support the plan as proposed.

—How would you propose we attract new business to town?
We missed an opportunity to locate a very large business here , with over 1,000 jobs, because we could not guarantee a 40-year water supply. Certainly a necessity for attracting new business is a long-term renewable/sustainable supply of water. CIDC has stated many times that most of the industries considering a location in Clovis need a good supply of water.
I believe that the efforts of Clovis Industrial Development Corporation to attract new industry and jobs to our community are also attracting new retail businesses. New jobs equal growth.
Along with CIDC’s efforts to attract new businesses, I would like to see more of an effort to assist local businesses, both agricultural and commercial/industrial, with growth and expansion.

—What is your long-term vision for the city? And how will you plan for that?
It is imperative that the city acquire a renewable/sustainable supply of water for our community or there can be no promising long-term vision of growth for our city.
The recently completed Comprehensive Plan is a summary of the goals, wants, needs, and desires of the citizens of Clovis and Curry County. The two Local Growth Management groups are comprised of local professionals that are also working toward a prioritized, needs-based comprehensive plan. I believe these plans clearly define the best long-term vision for our community. The road leading to the success of these plans is uphill and will require a great deal of work by our elected officials. I support these plans and efforts.

—What do you think the city should do to address water conservation?
The City Commission just approved, by resolution, a water conservation plan that was developed specifically for Clovis by Daniel B. Stephens and Associates. The top priority in this plan, that would provide the greatest conservation benefit to our aquifer, is a recommendation to reuse our wastewater effluent. The plan contains a lengthy, prioritized list of additional recommendations for the water policy committee to work through.
The Commission also approved a design by CDM Engineering for the pipeline, pumps, storage tanks and equipment to deliver the Class 1-A effluent throughout the city to our parks, playgrounds and high-volume users of outdoor watering.
I strongly support both of these plans and look forward to the ground-breaking for the effluent pipeline.

—What do you consider the city’s greatest need today? And how should we resolve that issue?
Based on my answers to the previous questions, it is obvious that I believe water is our greatest need. Both short term and long term. New Mexico American measurements of saturated thickness show a decrease of 10.2 feet in just three years (average of all wells). At the end of our water supply, growth stops. Property values fall.
The Federal Bureau of Reclamation, after reviewing all options including deep water wells and continued drilling and expansion of the existing system, declared that the Ute Water Pipeline is the “best technical alternative” for a long-term renewable water supply for our microplex area. Engineering firms that performed peer reviews arrived at the same conclusion.
It will require a “BRAC level” effort by our microplex communities as well as our Chambers of Commerce and Industrial Development Corporations, in support of the Eastern New Mexico Rural Water Authority.

—Do you think the city needs more or fewer ordinances? What are some ordinances that need to be added or removed?
Many of the city’s ordinances are amended or replaced as the city attorney keeps Clovis current with constantly changing state and federal regulations. Still others will be needed for example, to implement enforceable recommendations of the water conservation plan that was adopted by resolution. Plans are normally adopted by resolution and implemented by ordinance. Therefore, yes, there will be more ordinances in our future.
It is always good to review and amend or restructure ordinances and historically this happens when someone brings a problem to the attention of a commissioner. The process has worked quite well for the past four years.

Candidate: Rosalie Riley
Age: 56
Occupation: Owner of Katie’s Flowerland
Prior elected positions: None

—What do you want to see happen to Hotel Clovis and how do you propose we get there?
We should research all historical grants available to restore the hotel as a cornerstone to revitalize Clovis’ downtown.
—How would you propose we attract new business to town?

The best way to attract new business to Clovis is to have a competent and skilled work force.

— What is your long-term vision for the city? And how will you plan for that?
The long-term plan should be to make sure Clovis is a reliant, self-sustaining community, not reliant on one industry. Every family in Clovis should have the opportunity to achieve a healthy and prosperous life.

—What do you think the city should do to address water conservation?
We should look into ways of recycling water.

—What do you consider the city’s greatest need today? And how should we resolve that issue?
We need to plan Clovis’ growth.

—Do you think the city needs more or fewer ordinances? What are some ordinances that need to be added or removed?
We need to make sure we can enforce the ones we have before we can effectively evaluate whether we need new ones.