City commission candidates — District 3

CNJ staff

Candidate: Fidel Madrid
Age: 60
Occupation: UPS driver, 31 years.
Prior elected position: Fair board for 12 years.

• What do you want to see happen to Hotel Clovis and how do you propose we get there?
What I would like to see happen with Hotel Clovis would be for it to be remodeled, but the city cannot afford to finance that big of a project so I would suggest that investors be found to fund the renovation of the Hotel Clovis.

• How would you propose we attract new business to town?
The way I would propose that we attract new businesses to town would be to use tax incentives, plus use the Internet to advertise the great weather we have and the friendly people we have in the Southwest.

• What is your long-term vision for the city? And how will you plan for that?
The long-term vision I have for the city would be for the city to grow and attract more businesses such as Sam’s Club, Home Depot and Target. Many Clovis residents travel to bigger cities and spend money there, when they could be spending their money in our city.

• What do you think the city should do to address water conservation?
The city should educate Clovis residents on the importance of water conservation. We need to start landscaping our yards with plants and grass that do not require as much water.

• What do you consider the city’s greatest need today? And how should we resolve that issue?
I think the city’s greatest need today is to look after our people that work for the city, such as firemen, EMTs, policemen and city employees. We need to send out surveys to other cities and see if the pay rate is comparable. We need to make sure all of our employees are paid fairly for the jobs they do in the city. I think the ordinances that the city has now are fine.

• Do you think the city needs more or fewer ordinances? What are some ordinances that need to be added or removed?
I think the ordinances that the city has now are fine.

Candidate: Bobby Sandoval
Age: 71
Occupation: Retired timekeeper for Postal Service.
Prior elected position: Elected to City Commission in 2004; also current Curry County Commissioner; previously held city and county commission offices in 1971.

• What do you want to see happen to Hotel Clovis and how do you propose we get there?
The problem with the hotel is simply the amount of money that it will take to do anything with it — Roughly $1 million dollars to demolish it and probably $6 to 10 million to rebuild and refurbish it. We hope that we have finally come up with the right combination of private investors and grant funds to do something with it. Grants are something that you never know about, but we are hoping and praying.

• How would you propose we attract new business to town?
I believe that new business attracts new business. As Cannon Air Force Base slowly picks back up, more people will be moving into Clovis. This in turn will attract more business to our local area. Also the expansion of the runway at our municipal airport (which should be starting soon) should attract more and larger aircraft. This will be a big plus.

• What is your long-term vision for the city? And how will you plan for that?
My long-term vision for Clovis is one of solid growth and with all of these new businesses coming in, one of better jobs for our youth so that they won’t have to leave Clovis for a better quality of life.

• What do you think the city should do to address water conservation?
The city of Clovis uses only about 4 percent of the water that comes from the Ogalalla aquifer. The rest is being used by agriculture. I believe that the only solution to this problem is to better manage our use of water by our farmers.

• What do you consider the city’s greatest need today? And how should we resolve that issue?
I think that our two greatest needs today are water and better roads, in that order. Our water concerns hopefully will be addressed by better water management by agriculture and hopefully the Ute pipeline.

• Do you think the city needs more or fewer ordinances? What are some ordinances that need to be added or removed?
I don’t think that the problem lies in more or fewer ordinances. I think that it lies in better planning and in more long-range consideration (how is this ordinance going to affect Clovis five or 10 years from now, instead of just how it will affect Clovis today). I see a great Clovis today and a better Clovis tomorrow.