Boy Scouts take to sidewalks to learn about local religious groups

CNJ staff photo: Liliana Castillo Cub scout Jason Scioli, right, and his brother Matthew Scioli look over a prayer book Saturday at Saint James Episcopal Church during the scouts Ten Commandments Hike.

By Liliana Castillo: CNJ staff writer

Local Boy Scouts took to the sidewalks Saturday to learn about Clovis’ various faith groups in the second annual Ten Commandments Hike.

The event served as an outing for the Scouts and an opportunity to learn, said longtime volunteer Cheryle Csakan.

“If you learn more, you understand more,” she said.

This is the second year the El Llando Grande Boy Scouts have completed the hike. A group of about 30 Cub and Boy Scouts, parents and volunteers visited churches and heard from 10 denominations in Clovis. Each faith group discussed a different commandment and told the group some history about their church.

“It’s great that the Scouts want their boys taught spiritually,” Assistant Pastor Alan Brockmeier of Saint James Episcopal Church said. “In this event, the children see and understand better how the body of Christ works. Each denomination does things a little differently, in a different style, but it comes back as one.”

Csakan said religion is in each of the Scouts promises, duty to God and church, but the goal of the Scouts it to cultivate duty to the community in general. Csakan said the tour of churches could also help ease worries about entering a new church.

“So many families don’t have a church home,” Csakan said. “People are sometimes afraid to just go into a church. This may help them feel more comfortable.”

Clay Rains of Clovis brought his two sons and their friend to the event after enjoying last year’s hike.

“It’s a good experience for the kids,” Rains said. “Just seeing the different churches and hearing about the different beliefs.”

Rains said the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts usual activities teach boys about God’s creation.

Each of the Scouts who took part in the hike received a patch. Csakan said the patch was more decorative than normal because the hike took place in the centennial year of the Scouts.