Ethnic fair returns

CNJ file photo Cash Brown of Houston gets his vehicle ready for last year’s Ethnic Fair car show. Brown has brought a car to the show since 2003. The Ethnic Fair is scheduled for Saturday on Main Street in Clovis.

Kevin Wilson: CNJ staff writer

It’s about ethnicity, no doubt. But it’s also about entertainment and education.

The Ethnic Fair, in its 19th year in Clovis, runs next week, with the brunt of events Sept. 25 along Main Street.

The fair’s mission statement is to provide a way for ethnic groups in the area to share unique elements from each culture and understand and appreciate each other.

“The different components are a reflection of your community, as well as your surrounding area,” said Selmus Price, chairman of the Clovis Ethnic/Cultural Arts Committee. “It’s basically to educate the public on the craft.”

The first elements begin Monday, with batik and tye dye workshops at Frinnifrock’s Color Factor and drum and dance workshops at the Roy Walker Community Center. Each event is scheduled for 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. throughout the week.

Saturday starts with a fun run/walk, and includes a car show, musical groups, dancing performances and a talent show.

Price said the format for this year’s fair is basically the same as in previous years, with a mariachi band, flamenco dancers, the New Mexico Society of Buffalo Soldiers and African group Agalu.

“Whether it’s the drums, whether it’s the art or the clothing,” Price said, “you’re looking to feature whatever they have to showcase their culture.”

Akeem Ayanniyi, the leader of Santa Fe-based Agalu, said the group has been performing at the fair for 10 years, and first came to know about it when he performed for a state NAACP function, where he met Price.

“We like to be part of it,” Ayanniyi said. “It’s very ethnic, a very festive scene. We like being part of it.”

Price said Agalu usually comes to a school during the week to educate students about their music. He said if it’s possible, “you need to go” because the group is able to involve everybody, from student to school employee, in the act.

Price said one of the best things about the fair is that you never know where the information will reach.

During a 1997 fair, U.S. Rep. Bill Redmond spoke with Ira Potter of the New Mexico Society of the Buffalo Soldiers, and later gave Potter recognition during a session of Congress. The following year, Price said, Redmond helped lead legislation to recognize Buffalo Soldiers across the country.


Ethnic Fair Schedule

Monday through Friday

10 a.m. — Batik and Tye Dye workshops, Frinnifrock’s Color Factor, 401 N. Main

10 a.m. — Drum and Dance workshops, Roy Walker Community Center.

5:30 p.m. — Batik and Tye Dye workshops, Frinnifrock’s Color Factor, 401 N. Main

5:30 p.m. — Drum and Dance workshops, Roy Walker Community Center.

Saturday

8:30 a.m. —