Latin Comedy Jam comedian not afraid of silence

By Joshua Lucero

Staff writer

jlucero@cnjonline.com

Dillion-Garcia

Courtesy Photo

At 17 years old, Dillon Garcia was the youngest comedian on Comedy Central when he took the stage on the show “Stand Up Revolution.”

Now 22, the Whittier, Calif., native is part of the Latin Comedy Jam tour, which stops in eastern New Mexico on Saturday with a performance at the Clovis Civic Center.

Garcia said his comedic inspiration comes from everyday events where he finds humor that his audiences can relate to.

 

Q: How did you get started in comedy?

Garcia: I was given an opportunity by a comedian. My mom met a comedian that had a show at the Hollywood Improv and my mom apparently thought I was funny, so she put me on the show. The comedian gave me a shot at the Improv and I did comedy for the first time and fell in love with it. Since then I haven’t stopped.

 

Q: What comic or comics do you look up to?

Garcia: Russell Peters is by far my biggest mentor and role model. I think he’s hilarious and very influential on my career. He once told me at his multi-million dollar home in Hollywood, Calif., “Comedy bought this” and I knew how far I could go in this industry.

 

Q:Where do you think you’re going with comedy from this point?

Garcia: I feel like my next step in comedy is just finding my voice, trying to find out what I want to talk about, and what message I want to put out there. I want to become more personal with my comedy instead of just using random thoughts.

 

Q: What motivates you to get on stage?

Garcia: The crowd basically. The adrenaline; the fact that you’re going to make people feel better. Making other people laugh and be happy is what motivates me.

 

Q: What is your method for coming up with new material?

Garcia: My method is a lot different than everybody else’s. Everybody else writes jokes down on paper. They literally sit down and write about their thoughts. I’m just writing material as it comes. As my life progresses, that’s how the jokes come out. My jokes are just about everyday things that happen to me. I haven’t experienced as much as the older comedians, so I’m just going with the flow.

 

Q: Have you ever considered any other careers?

Garcia: Never! I’m going to die a comedian. I want to do some acting eventually and movies and stuff, but I’ll always do comedy.

 

Q: What’s an ideal day look like for you?

Garcia: Wake up, grab some Starbucks, check my email, talk to my manager, look at comedy clubs that are looking for weekend performers, chill, watch some television, and get ready to do a show.

 

Q: What sets you apart from other comics?

Garcia: I’m not afraid of silence. Sometimes I’ll literally just stand there for like five seconds of silence and then say something. You’re building up momentum is what you’re doing (with silence).

 

Q:What is a moment in your life that sticks out in your mind?

Garcia: The first time I did Gabriel Iglesias’ show “Stand Up Revolution.” I got a standing ovation at the end of the show and I was 17 years old and I had just broken a record for youngest comedian on Comedy Central. It was a very special moment. I had to hold back tears. I’ll remember that forever.